improv school

The Skinny on… Laci Lee

Mopco cast member since 2014


What was your favorite toy as a child?

I had a Birthday Barbie that I was obsessed with for years. I wouldn’t let anyone play with her and she had her own stand. 

What’s your favorite local restaurant?

It used to be Mingle, in Albany, but they closed so now it’s New World Bistro

Would you rather travel to the moon or the bottom of the sea?

To the moon, better peripheral vision. 

What’s your motto?

I don’t know if I have one, but I have a Pinterest board of quotes and sayings and here’s one I like: “I’m a simple woman, I like handsome bearded brunette men and breakfast food.”

Come Make Up Songs!

Admit it. You were skeptical when you read that class description for Mopco’s “Sing Your Butt Off! Summer Music Class.”

Beginners learning to improvise songs? you scoffed, inwardly. Impossible!

Nevertheless intrigued, you wanted to know more. You wanted to know what happens in the class. How this is possible.

So I went ahead and asked for you. Here’s what Mopco Musical Director Mark S. Meritt explained.

 1. The class covers aspects of melody, harmony, working with an accompanist, and basic song structure. The building blocks, really, for creating a song.

2. Students who’ve improvised before can use their improv skills to create lyrics (otherwise known as just plain words). The only difference here is the words are set to music. 

3. Students who haven’t improvised before will still be able to do this because the entire process is broken down into simple steps.

And suddenly, learning to improvise songs sounds like an attainable goal, after all.

[CLICK HERE TO REGISTER]

ONLY A FEW SPOTS LEFT!!!

Man, we are bussssyyyyyyy at Mopco Headquarters

 

Here we go!!!

 

Be Brave!

By Heather Schwartz

Does the thought of taking an improv class both intrigue you and scare you to death? If so, you’re not alone, especially if you don’t think of yourself as a performer. Let’s face it: In an improv class, you’ll be doing stuff—i.e. performing—in front of at least a few other people. It’s not the kind of thing everyone is naturally inclined to jump into.

Surprisingly, though, respected, talented, well-loved professional performers often experience those same feelings that might hold anyone back. Judy Dench lives in fear as a performer, according to The Stage. And E! Online reports Adele has a nervous habit of tossing her cookies before shows.

Why do tormented souls continue performing when it creates so much stress? That’s a question to be explored further in another post. The simple answer is this: Performing creates positive feelings, too. There’s a payoff. And it’s so amazing it’s worth working through some anxiety to get it.